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Monthly Archives: November 2015

GarryRogers Nature Conservation

Today’s demonstrations are in response to climate change. We want to show our leaders that we want them to take steps to stop global warming. We must also ask our leaders to change the human activities that are causing climate change.

  1. We want them to block corporate control over our government and the decisions it makes.
  2. We want them to end international sales of weapons and begin to encourage peace and a focus on life style and resource use.
  3. We want them to discourage unsustainable resource harvests.
  4. We want them to encourage human rights and equality.
  5. We want them to speak out for wild animals and natural ecosystems.
  6. We want them to call for restoring the damaged lands and seas.
  7. And finally, we want them to oppose gender inequality and overpopulation.

We know that even if we stopped burning fossil fuels today, activities causing climate change would continue. Farming, deforestation…

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Hethersett Birdlife

Short days continue to minimise birding opportunities however you never know when something new will come your way if you keep eyes and ears open. Ears are particularly important with birds and this morning the laughing call or ‘yaffle’ alerted me to a green woodpecker in the centre of the village. These are rarely seen away from fields and park lands locally but perhaps some Autumn fare has brought them in.

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Green Woodpecker Credit: David Sargant via Compfightcc

I have taken the limited late afternoon opportunities to walk the local patch before the birds go to roost. The nights quickly sweep in and many local birds are tucked up and quiet before I get out. The most noticeable recently have been the larger birds and the smallest. Pheasants have been noticeable in the local fields and tend to roost later in trees and high hedges but perhaps more surprising…

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GarryRogers Nature Conservation

“Today, many still think of the coastal redwood forests as a dark, primeval rainforest, such as those depicted in the likes of Star Wars and Jurassic Park. However, the progress of human activity over the last 150 years has resulted in a reality which is in stark contrast to the idyllic images portrayed in Hollywood.

“The “progress” of human activity over the last 150 years has resulted in a landscape that would be unrecognizable to those first European-American settlers. Once, the ancient coastal redwood forests spanned some two million acres of California’s scenic and rugged coastline, from Big Sur all the way to the Oregon border. By the time Redwood National Park was created in 1968, a mere 100 years after the advent of European-American settlement, the once vast and mighty coastal old-growth redwood forest had been reduced to an estimated 10 percent of its original range. By the close…

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GarryRogers Nature Conservation

Working with SAFE, climate scientist Stephen Hardwick found that palm oil plantations are on average 6.5 degrees Celsius hotter that primary (never logged) rainforest. This disparity means the difference between life and death for sensitive species like termites and earthworms that play a drastically important role in the rainforest ecosystem by controlling the rate at which things decompose. Even lightly logged forest was 2.5 degrees hotter than primary forests. In these forests, Hardwick found that the hotter it got, the more water trees used and the more vulnerable they became to droughts. This discovery casts doubt on the eco-friendliness of selective harvesting – a method of logging that in which only trees above a certain size are felled and which was previously perceived as sustainable.

“That doubt that was furthered by studies showing how the extra, unclaimed logs left behind in selective harvesting are actually doing harm to the environment…

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RED POWER MEDIA

"Wocekiye Unwohiye” Success through Prayer. Photo: Facebook “Wocekiye Unwohiye” Success through Prayer. Photo: Facebook

For Immediate Release: 11/10/2015

Rosebud, SD Tribal Nations ranchers and farmers from South Dakota and Nebraska to celebrate the Death of the Black Snake / Keystone XL rejection.

The Rosebud Sioux Tribe announced this morning that they will be hosting a Keystone XL Rejection Victory Celebration. The celebration is titled “Wocekiye Unwohiye” Success through Prayer. The Celebration will take place at the Sinte Gleska University Multi-Purpose Center, 101 Antelope Lake Circle, Mission, South Dakota over two days.

The two day celebration is in tribute of another great victory that of the Battle of the Greasy Grass aka Battle of the Little Big Horn. On June 26, 1876, 139 years ago this battle took place and the Lakota, Nakota, Dakota Cheyenne and Arapaho defeated the US Calvary. The victory celebration and dance was held in Rosebud and hosted by the Sicangu Oyate soon after…

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RED POWER MEDIA

The Huffington Post

Environmental activists praised the decision.

President Barack Obama on Friday rejected TransCanada’s application to build the Keystone XL pipeline, which would have transported oil across the United States-Canada border.

After seven years of reviewing the project, Obama announced his final decision from the Roosevelt Room in the White House.

“The State Department has decided the Keystone XL pipeline would not serve the national interest of the United States — I agree with that decision.”

His rejection came after meeting earlier Friday with Secretary of State John Kerry, whose department oversaw the review.

Taking a jab at the politicization of the pipeline, Obama said it had become “overinflated” in public discourse.

“Shipping dirtier crude oil into our country would not increase America’s energy security,” Obama said.

Tensions over the proposed Keystone XL pipeline have been high for years, with Obama’s environmental base pressuring him to reject the project and…

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